Justin McCormickComment

EPISODE 4 - Coolant and Hoses

Justin McCormickComment
EPISODE 4 - Coolant and Hoses

Our bus came with two heaters, a seat heater in the back and a larger heater/defroster in the front. These heaters are connected to the engine which pumps coolant to them via a long loop of hoses. We want to keep the heaters, but we need to temporarily pull out the hoses to work on the bus floor. 

There usually is a shut off valve for the coolant near the engine, which in my case was in the rear of the bus. After shutting off the valve we began to take out the metal case that was constructed over the hose. As always there was a handful of screws that stripped out and I needed to cut them out with the angle grinder.

With the metal casing out we began to disconnect the hose at the various joints. I was worried that we would end up spilling coolant everywhere, a common story I have read about on other people’s conversion blogs. So I was well prepared with lots of buckets, and every joint I disconnected was done with suspenseful care. However, everything went smoothly and we did not have any major spills.

I disconnected the rear seat heater by cutting all the wires and hoses that connected it. The front plate of the heater is damaged so I am going to see if I can repair it before putting it back in.

It was a fair amount of work for the day, but now that it’s done we can start tearing out the floors.

Justin McCormick grew up in the Yukon Territories in a cabin on Nisutlin Bay. Being surrounded by the majestic and harsh wilderness of the north, he developed a passion for canoeing, hiking, mountain climbing and skiing. He currently resides in Texas and is trying to impart his passion for the outdoors to his four children.